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Company Intranet / IS Department Intanet

Our current Intranet site is severely outdated and is in dire need of a facelift. Not only is a facelift necessary, but our company has changed quite a bit since the first design. The site is very static and doesn’t quite meet the needs of the employees.

The objective is to create a UI that that is easy to navigate, provide the users with not only company-wide or specific departmental information, but also the proper tools, functionlity, and accessability to complete various tasks.

Early in the design process I interviewed various employees asking them about their likes and dislikes of the current site. It was a bit of a struggle getting out of them what they liked about the site, but they could easily talk all day about what they don’t like. I also asked them about their specific job, how the intranet site fits into their daily routine and what information do they search for that pertains to their job versus personal use.

Next, I talked to members of management. A lot of my questions were similar to the questions I asked the employees. The common complaint from both employees and management about the site is that there’s no way to do a search. Also to cut down on Info-clutter and cognitive load, the site needed to be a little more “smarter.” The users will have access to a lot of the same information and tools that can be seen by everyone, but each department is unique and should have access to certain items or what’s relevant or viewable to their department only.

After several meetings and interviews I developed a persona and drew out a storyboard to take into the next meeting. Shortly after I was able to come up with some sketches, then wireframes and then a few prototypes to show.

Currently, this is still an ongoing project. Hopefully we will have a final design “nailed down” soon. I look forward to showcasing our final decision.

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XREF Account Number Lookup

Although the design is the most simplified, this is probably one of the most important applications I’ve worked on at Hilliard Lyons.

Our company just went thru a major transition. In order to make the company more lean and efficient, some of the services the company offer as a financial firm is being farmed out to a partner company. That means the sharing and tranfer of data, such as account information and account numbers. Because both companies have different ways of handling data, transferring these accounts meant that they all had to be given new account numbers. We also had to keep track of the old account numbers as well.

FC’s (Financial Consultants), Operations department and other authorized users must have a way to cross-reference new account numbers with the original account numbers. My objective on this project was to make this UI straight to the point, minimized and somewhat trivial. Sounds easy right? Surprisingly, a lot people within the company wanted their hands on this project. So everyone had an opinion. The waters started to “muddy up” very early. What should’ve been a very simple interface started turning into a feature-heavy cluttered application. One thing we knew for sure is that a variety of different people with slightly different backgrounds will be using this application. However, they only have one common goal, and that’s to retrieve an old or new account number. There’s absoluely no reason to slap on a bunch of extra features or buttons.

So after several meetings, we agreed to keep it minimal. I sat down and talked to more potential users to make sure I had a very clear understanding of the purpose of cross-referencing the account numbers and the different scenarios were that would be necessary. I also wanted to observe them at work to see their current way of cross-referencing, which usually consisted of opening two different applications.

The end result... a very simple K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) design layout. After creating sketches, wireframes and a clickable prototype, we could finally move forward. I created the front-end using Visual Studio while working closly with the back-end developers.

Pre-transition and post-transition, this application has been heavily used company-wide.

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P.A.R. (Personal Action Request) Form

Employment statuses are constantly changing, and that’s were the P.A.R. form comes in. Hilliard Lyons needed a form that could be quick and easy for management to fill out and send thru the chain of command when an employee’s status change.

Once the form is filled out, it travels thru the chain of command, to the specified supervisors for their approvals. The supervisor will get an email notifying that they have a form to approve. Once approved, it moves on to the next supervsor for approval. Once all approvals are complete, it lands within queue for Human Resources for final say so. The form can also be tracked in real time as to who’s still sitting on it and can send an email alert if it sits in their queue too long.

I modeled the tracking after the package tracking feature found in some mail tracking apps... UPS and Fed-X for example. Before-hand, spending time with upper management and taling to the staff of Human Resources was a must.

One of the challenges was to keep everyone focused on solutions instead of features or “Bells and whistles.” This form will contain a lot of fields, so the water can very easily get muddy if we’re not careful.

We did not want to send the user to a page to select a form from a list. We also did not want a cluttered elongated page. To cut down on cognitive load, clutter, and the over-utilization of space, it seemed best to make the form dynamic. Fields should change according to what form type is selected from the menu. So when the user opens the application, they’re greeted with a form selection menu across the top and the fields that are common for all the form types. Once they make a form selection, the screen is then populated with the additional info or fields pertaining to that form type only.

Eventually I was able to run with it and create wireframes and a working prototype.

The result:
A dynamic form that changes based on menu selection and provides the user specifically what they need. Once the form is submitted, it can be tracked down it’s most recent approval. An automated email notification is sent out when a form is awaiting approval for the sake of preventing delays and providing transparency.

This application was widely used throughout the company for some time.







About Me

This is a compilation of my work as a designer over the years. I am constantly working to improve my skill as a professional.

I attended University of Louisville. I am currently the UI/UX designer at Hilliard Lyons with over 15 years of experience. Other companies I've worked for are Courier Journal (Gannett) and Yum! Brands.

As a UI/UX Designer, my work is focused on solving "user problems." I execute the design of applications used company-wide utilizing the most widely used software brands and platforms. Able to take a project from storyboards to wireframes... from wireframes to prototype... and from prototype to front-end development. Always striving to put the user first in order to compose the best overall user experience possible. Very resourceful skill-set while strong on the creative side.

As far back as I can remember, design has always had a place in my heart. This is what I do.

Picasso once said "It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child". Design at times can be very structured and dogmatic. We forget how to think outside the box and your creative process becomes stifled. Creating a proper balance is what I always strive to do.


The Work

Web

UI/UX

Advertising

Logos

Illustration

Artwork





Experience

Work Experience



UX/Prototyping Experience



Software Experience



Coding Experience




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